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Kennedy takes Zaaldercross / Serrat succeeds at Fool’s Gold

This past Saturday, AES athlete Ann Kennedy consolidated a strong start to her season by winning Zaaldercross (part of the GPBR Series) in nearby Vancouver, Washington.  The win puts her 3rd in her class with two events yet to run.  Here's a photo of Ann in action:

https://goo.gl/XAhlmg

 

Endurance mountain biker Ed Serrat has had a great season, with notable results across the country.  An 11th place finish at Oregon's High Cascades 100 was followed up this past weekend with 13th at Fool's Gold.  The latter result was achieved after delays caused by a rear tire puncture in the early miles.

Here's a photo of Ed in action:

https://goo.gl/cptuWi

Elle Anderson Season Review

I recently wrote a little article for Quarq detailing Elle Anderson's successful 2015/2016 cyclocross season.  Check it out on the Quarq website:

http://blog.quarq.com/post/138937762976/elle-anderson-season-review-and-power-analysis

Podium Weekend For Serrat and Anderson

AES mountain bike racer Ed Serrat finished his season on a high at The Iceman Cometh in his home state of Michigan.  Ed had been targeting Iceman and had an excellent race against a stellar field.  Ed's season has been fantastic and we're looking forward to 2016!

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That's Ed on the left!

Also today, AES Pro CX rider Elle Anderson rode to a podium finish in the Derby City Cup ProCX race against a stacked field.   Elle has been preparing for her 2015/2016 European campaign and she's off to an excellent start. 

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Elle on the right!  Photo by SRAM.

Serrat hits target at High Cascades 100

AES athlete Ed Serrat rode to an excellent 14th place finish in his first High Cascades 100.  It was his first time riding in Bend and the trails seemed well-suited to his talents.  His Vets Men time of 9.27 would have placed him in the top-20 of the Open Men.  He plans to return next year as well.

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Ed and his grandson(!) post-race at the High Cascades 100.

Team AES-Cable Huston in Portland Monthly Magazine

The sport of cyclocross, and team Aeolus Endurance Sport-Cable Huston, was recently profiled in a Portland Monthly Magazine feature entitled "Break a Sweat Like Portland's Top Athletes."

Check it out!

http://www.portlandmonthlymag.com/health-and-fitness/fitness/articles/break-a-sweat-like-portlands-top-athletes-january-2015

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AboutFace Magazine Interview

I was recently interviewed in a local magazine.  We spoke about coaching and, of course, VeloPro.  Here's the article:

http://www.aboutfacemag.com/interviews/health/adnan-kadir-cyclist-trainer/

Serrat and Kennedy Podium at IceMan and OBRA CX Champs

AES athlete Ed Serrat had a great race at Michigan's Iceman Cometh.  Ed had spent the autumn preparing for his season finale here, and he finished it well in 3rd place.  Here are the nasty conditions the race saw this year:

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Meanwhile, at the OBRA Cyclocross Championships, AES athlete Ann Kennedy scored a 3rd place finish in the Masters A class.

Over the top radio Velopro interview #2

George Thomas had myself, along with VeloPro beta testers Jeff S and Monty H on the show to take last week's interview a bit further into the user experience realm:

Check Out Fitness Podcasts at Blog Talk Radio with overthetop on BlogTalkRadio

Over The Top Radio interview about Velopro

Check out this great interview from George Thomas of Over The Top Radio.  We discuss my VeloPro project in detail:

Check Out Fitness Podcasts at Blog Talk Radio with overthetop on BlogTalkRadio

Santiago takes Iron Horse Classic

AES athlete Maria Santiago won the Iron Horse Classic this weekend.  Maria took two stage wins en route to a convincing victory.  Read more about it here:

http://www.durangoherald.com/article/20140526/SPORTS01/140529643/Santiago-survives-%E2%80%98suffer-fest%E2%80%99

Build your fitness house

Originally written for RaceCenterNW Magazine.

Everyone has heard the old adage: "before you do intensity, you need to build your base." While there are a few things to consider between individuals and training plans, that's basically true. Base training lays the foundation for the training and racing that follows, allowing you to reach your target events fully recovered and in top form.

Think of your fitness as a house. The attic is peak form – the very top. The second floor is high-level VO2Max fitness, while the first floor is LT (lactate threshold) fitness. In order for all of this to stand up and for the structure to be solid, it needs a good foundation. Your aerobic base is the foundation for your "fitness house."

So, does this mean that you ought to spend the whole winter riding around at nothing above your Endurance Level (often referred to as Level, or Zone 2)? It most certainly does not. What it means is that the bulk of your aerobic training, whether it is swim, bike or run, should be at your Endurance Level. It's still important to do a bit of LT and VO2 work in the base-building period, because doing those boosts your aerobic fitness and also your ability to recover between workouts and, eventually, races. This can be done either in your primary sports, or in the gym, or even with some cross-training.

Let's have a look at what a typical Base Period week might look like. Monday is almost always a good day to take complete rest, after the weekend of long endurance workouts. On Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, take an easy (Level 1) day. On the other two, choose one and make it your LT or VO2Max day. It's only necessary to do one day per week of this type of training, at most. Also, it isn't necessary to do more than one or the other in a given week – alternate weeks with one containing an LT workout and the next a VO2Max workout. Then, take Friday off and relax. You'll be well on your way to building a solid endurance foundation.

All Torque and No Action

Originally written for and published in RacecenterNW Magazine.

It's easy to pick the experienced riders out on virtually any group ride. They're the ones who sit relaxed in the saddle while pedaling in smooth, quick circles, seemingly without effort. They have an economy of motion borne of years learning to be as efficient as possible. These riders have mastered one of the keys to cycling efficiency – cadence.

Much fuss has been made about cadence in recent years and, upon examination, it's easy to see why. In cycling, power is torque multiplied by angular velocity. That is, a rider creates power through pedal force (torque) and pedaling speed (angular velocity). One can create more power by pedaling harder or by pedaling faster.

Most of us have a natural tendency to turn over the pedals at a relatively low speed (70-90rpm). It's manageable, steady, and it makes us feel like we're working hard. In fact, we are working hard – harder than we should be! It takes a relatively high amount of muscular power to turn the pedals around at low cadences. Since our muscles hold just a couple of hours' worth of fuel, pedaling at a low cadence only works until our legs fatigue, at which point our race is effectively over. So, pedaling harder works well, but only for a short time.

As endurance athletes, we have a high level of aerobic fitness relative to muscular strength. Pedaling faster effectively takes the stress away from our muscles and transfers it to our aerobic systems. A high pedal cadence leverages the aerobic fitness that our sports already give us, thereby saving our muscular strength for when we need it, such as on steep hills, rollers, or sprints. Pedaling faster allows us to be more efficient and, therefore, better athletes.

Now that you're convinced that you need to pedal faster, how do you go about doing it? In a word: practice. Pedaling at lower cadences trains your muscle firing patterns to do exactly that – pedal slowly. After some time, you're optimized for it. The way to optimize your muscles for higher cadences is to practice those. Start with your warm-ups and cool downs – set a goal of 90+rpm during those times and track it. When you've mastered that, raise your goal to 100rpm, and so on. When you've mastered high cadences in warm-up and cool down, begin, if it doesn't already come naturally by now, to focus on integrating it into your workout sets. Before long, you'll be more efficient, with less muscular fatigue – and a better chance of reaching your goals.

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